UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN River Falls

About The Program

Fall 2019 Courses

Participants in the fall program enroll in a minimum of 15 credits offered in a module format. In this format, courses are taught one at a time in three-week blocks. You'll enroll in only one course per module. The descriptions provided below indicate the module the course will be offered. The required Scotland: Society and Globalization course runs through the entirety of the semester on Monday evenings. Dates for the fall program can be found on our calendars page.

REQUIRED
Course & Textbook Equivalent  

Scotland: Society & Globalization/Scottish Professor
Gerry Mooney/3 cr.

Scotland: Society & Globalization is a wide-ranging course that explores different aspects of contemporary Scottish society. Locating Scotland in its historical and global contexts,  he course focuses on many of the key social, economic, cultural and political issues that face Scotland today. It considers many of the ways that globalization can be said to be impacting on Scottish economy and society and takes a multi- and inter- disciplinary approach. The course draws on sociology, social policy, social history and human geography. The course emphasizes the importance & usefulness of comparative and trasnational comparisons for the understanding of developments in a particular national context. Comparisons between different aspects of Scottish and US societies will occupy centre stage; students will be required to reflect on points of similarity & convergence between US & Scottish/UK society.

Textbook(s): Textbook provided in Scotland; no purchase required.

Lake Superior State University: POLI 377/3 cr.

Murray State University: SOC 465: Globalization; HIS 390: Special Topics

Normandale Community College: HIST Elective/3 cr. (5, 8)

UW-Colleges: GEN EL/General Elective/3 cr.

UW-Oshkosh: SS Elective 008U (SS)

UW-River Falls: WIS 305/Scotland: Society & Globalization/3 cr., Liberal Arts (HF), GE (GP)

UW-Stout: CAHSS 205/Scotland: Society & Globalization/3 cr.

UW-Superior: SOCI 201/Social Problems in Global Perspectives/3 cr. (Social Inquiry)

UW-Whitewater: LSINDP 999/L&S Interdisciplinary Elective/3 cr. (GI)

 

MODULE ONE (select one course from the following options)
Course & Textbook Equivalent

Theatre Appreciation - Edinburgh Fringe Festival/Joan Navarre/UW-Stout/3 cr.

Development of theatre arts from ancient times to present; play styles, production methods and audience appreciation; representative plays. This course emphasizes the relationships between the technical and artistic components of theatre practices of the past and present from cultures around the world.

Utilizing the Edinburgh Festival Fringe as the laboratory experience, students will:

  • Develop an appreciation for a general history of the theatre and the diversity of theatrical forms
  • Acquire a vocabulary of theater terms and explore theatrical genres
  • Develop an appreciation of the various facets of the working and performing theatre
  • Explore how the technical and artistic components of theatre complement each other.
  • Develop the ability to articulate a critical analysis or review of the theatrical performances that they attend

Textbook(s): No textbook required; course readings will be supplied free of charge via Canvas

UW-River Falls: SASA 105/Intro to Theatre & Drama/3 cr. (HF)

UW-Stout:  THEA 112/Theatre Appreciation/3 cr.

UW-Superior:  COMM 232/Theatre Appreciation/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: THEATRE 100/Theatre Appreciation/3 cr.

Postcolonial Film and Literature/Lissa Schneider-Rebozo/UW-River Falls/3 cr.

In this course we will screen films and attend performances at the Edinburgh and Edinburgh Fringe Festivals that dramatize the lived experiences of people defined by colonial, anticolonial, and postcolonial histories associated with British expansionism and imperial rule. At its peak, the British Empire was the largest the world had ever known, and we are still reckoning its impact in the geopolitical struggles of today—from the turmoil throughout the United Kingdom and Europe over “Brexit;” to the Iraq war; to the precarious nuclear standoff between India and Pakistan. We will explore the subject through a variety of genres and subgenres: comedy, thriller, road movie, war story, sports  drama, documentary; in both contemporary and historical contexts; set in locales such as Ireland, Scotland, Australia, India, Iraq, Nigeria, Jamaica, South Africa, the United States and England.  Most mornings will be spent watching and discussing films at Dalkeith Castle, with our afternoons in Edinburgh at one of the Festivals or at places like Culloden Moor, site of the infamous Battle of Culloden that in one day took the lives of 2000 fighting for Scottish sovereignty against the British army.

Through the classroom and field experiences of the Scottish environment, students will: 
•    Develop an understanding of human behavior in colonial and postcolonial contexts
•    Conceptualize societal changes over time and the theoretical structures that account for those changes in the aftermath of colonial occupations
•    Explore the nature and development of ideas, beliefs, literature, language and the arts in historical and contemporary cultures affected by colonialism
•    Develop an understanding of cinematic, literary, and dramatic genre and aesthetic
•    Compare and contrast former settler colonies like our own in the United States with other kinds of colonial occupations and postcolonial cultures 

Textbook(s): No textbook required; course readings will be supplied free of charge via Canvas.

UW-River Falls: ENG/FILM 306/Postcolonial Film and Literature/3 cr. (GP)

UW-Stout: LIT GXX Literature Elective/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: FILM/ENGLISH 9999H Elective/ 3 cr.

 

MODULE TWO (select one course from the following options)
Course & Textbook Equivalent

Social Problems/Richard Mauldin/Lake Superior State University/3 cr.

In this course, you will be introduced to some areas that have been labeled and critically examined as social problems. There are two types of social problems: human behaviors that are in conflict with dominant norms and values, and social conditions that are perceived as threats to quality of life. By the end of this course, you will be able to critically evaluate both types of problems using some of the theoretical frameworks and analytical insights that the sociological lens provides. In learning to identify various aspects of social problems - such as assignment of blame, possible solutions, the interrelation of problems, or the identification of which groups are questioning the social condition and for what purpose- your values and beliefs may very well be challenged. Both discussion and debate will be encouraged. Regardless of where you side in an argument, this course will help you understand the consequences and implications of many of the positions adopted by politicians, community leaders, and social movements.

Textbook(s): Social Problems
by: D. Stanley Eitzen; Maxine Baca Zinn; Kelly Eitzen Smith
    Publisher: Pearson
    Print ISBN: 9780134631905, 0134631900
    Edition: 14th
    Copyright year: 2018

Lake Superior State University: SOCY 102/Social Problems/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: SOCI 210/Social Problems/3 cr.

UW-Stout: SOC 225/Social Problems/3 cr.

UW Superior: SOCI 189/Sociology Elective/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: SOCIOLOGY 250/Social Problems/3 cr.

Drawing I/III/Emily Beck/UW-Stout/3 cr.

In this course, we will work to perceive clearly, and develop strategies to transfer 3D scenes and objects from the world around us onto a 2D format. Most of our time spent in the course will involve drawing from direct observation. Through rigor and persistence, we'll strengthen our perceptual and technical skills and develop a level of comfort and fluidity with traditional drawing mediums. We will look to artists from the past to gain awareness of effective compositions, techniques and mediums.

Through constructive in-class critique and by discussing the work of art-historical 'masters' and comptemporary artists, we will learn to read the works of others, develop a stronger visual vocabulary, and consequently discover how to speak more clearly through our own work. We will strive to enhance and enrich the viewers' experience through our work and consequently endeavor to make the world a more beautiful, interesting and carefully considered place.

Students who have already completed Drawing I may elect to take this course at the higher, Drawing III level.

Textbook(s): Materials List
Drawing I: 1.    Curtis, Brian. Drawing from Observation: An Introduction to Perceptual Drawing (any edition).

Drawing III:  1.    Haynes, Deborah. Art Lessons: Meditations On The Creative Life.
2.    Dunning, Sandra. Advice to Young Artists in a Postmodern Era.
 

 

British History/Scottish faculty/3 cr.

This course is designed as a gateway to aspects of Scottish life, past and present. It aims to unravel some of the historical threads that explain Scotland's traditions, culture and attitudes (e.g. to democratic ideas, community, environment, gender issues, urban and rural life, popular culture, sport, etc.). Major historical issues and debates with historical and contemporary focus will underpin discussions, as will comparative approaches with European and American contexts as appropriate. Every opportunity will be taken for discussion of personal views and opinions, so the course is as much about exploring your own reactions to Scotland and fitting your own experiences into different contexts and situations as it is about 'knowledge'. 

Textbook(s):Textbook provided in Scotland; no purchase required.

Lake Superior State University:  HIST 277/3 cr.

Murray State University (KY): HIS 410: Modern Britain

Normandale Community College: HIST Elective
/3 cr. (5, 8)

UW-Colleges: HIST Elective/3 cr.

UW-Oshkosh: History 008/3 cr. (SS)

UW-River Falls: WIS 200/British History/3 cr., Liberal Arts (SB)

UW-Stout: HIST-GXX/History Elective/3 cr. (ARHU-HIST)

UW-Superior: HIST 289/Special Topics: British History/3 cr. (Humanities/History)

UW-Whitewater: HISTRY 999/History Elective/3 cr.

Career Exploration in an International Setting/On-site course mentor (Resident Director of Academics)/3 cr.

Career Exploration in an International Setting provides a framework that combines aspects of independent study and internship to facilitate the development of a deeper understanding of your field of study and future career aspirations in general, but also beyond the borders of the United States.  You will utilize a combination of job shadowing, informational interviews, online and local resources, and independent research to build a network within your field, and to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the diversity and breadth of career possibilities within your field.

This course is driven by the students' interests and curiosity about their chosen field. Students will actively pursue interviews, networking opportunities, and lines of inquiry independently. Independent research and reading must be undertaken by students. Course Mentors will provide guidance, feedback, suggestions and advice, and challenge students to delve deeper and ask questions.  Course Mentors will assist in making initial contacts at the beginning of the semester, however, students must be self-directed and willing to make contacts and engage outside of their 'comfort zone'.

Course Competencies 

  • Explore your field of study in Scotland 
  • Develop intercultural communication skills
  • Implement networking contacts in your chosen career field 
  • Develop the ability to be self-directed
  • Evaluate career possibilities within your field of study
  • Document experiences in chosen career field

Lake Superior State University: SERV 277/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: WIS 279/Career Exploration in an International Setting/3 cr.

UW-Stout: TRDIS 101/Career Exploration/(1 cr. + electives)

UW-Superior: IDS 297/Exploring Majors & Academics/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater:  LSINDP 999/L & S Interdisciplinary Elective/3 cr.

 

MODULE THREE (select one course from the following options)

Course & Textbook

Equivalent

Criminology/Richard Mauldin/Lake Superior State University/3 cr.

Criminology is the study not only of crime, but also of making laws and of the social reactions towards those who break them. The processes through which laws are developed, broken, reacted to and, perhaps, amended are all interconnected, and actions by citizens and decision-makers that address themselves towards remedying the "problem of crime" - at any of these stages - are often guided by unvoiced assumptions and generalizations about how the world works; about why people commit crime, and about how to deter them from committing crime in the future. In this course you will learn the importance of clarifying these unvoiced assumptions and we will deal with them formally by learning how to classify arguments in terms of their theoretical orientations. Once the logical constructions behind the framing of crime have been collectively revealed, you will be able to assess the validity of a given argument, give examples of possible counter-arguments and be able to support or refute these claims with empirical findings (such as data from the Uniform Crime Report or various types of victim surveys). In the course of using such "evidence" you will also learn the differing advantages and shortfalls of commonly employed methodologies (ways of studying crime).

Textbook(s):Criminology: Theories, Patterns and Typologies
13th Edition
Cengage Learning
by Larry J. Siegel
ISBN-10: 1337091847

Lake Superior State University:  SOCY  214/Criminology/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: CRIM 210/Criminal Behavior/3 cr.

UW-Stout: SOC 315/Criminology/3 cr.

UW Superior: CJUS 488 Criminology/ 3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: SOCIOLOGY 276/Intro to Criminology/3 cr.

Introduction to Art/Emily Beck/UW-Stout/3 cr.

Introduction to Art will expose students to a wide range of information in regard to current professional practices and historical and contemporary roles of artists in culture. Students will read about, independently discover, discuss and thoughtfully respond to this information, and consequently gain perspective on the art world today, and perhaps discover personal goals and practical approaches for their involvement within it.

Textbook(s):
Introduction to Art: 
1.    Robertson, Jean and McDaniel, Craig. Themes of Contemporary Art: Visual Art after 1980.
2.    Thornton, Sarah. Seven Days in the Art World.
3.    Getlein, Mark. Living with Art (B&b Art).

UW-River Falls: ART 100/Intro to Visual Art/3 cr.

UW-Stout: ARTH 222/Introduction to Art/3 cr.

UW Superior: ART 289/Art elective/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: ARTHIST 111 / Art Appreciation (GA)/ 3 cr.

Career Exploration in an International Setting/On-site course mentor (Resident Director of Academics)/3 cr.

Career Exploration in an International Setting provides a framework that combines aspects of independent study and internship to facilitate the development of a deeper understanding of your field of study and future career aspirations in general, but also beyond the borders of the United States.  You will utilize a combination of job shadowing, informational interviews, online and local resources, and independent research to build a network within your field, and to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the diversity and breadth of career possibilities within your field.

This course is driven by the students' interests and curiosity about their chosen field. Students will actively pursue interviews, networking opportunities, and lines of inquiry independently. Independent research and reading must be undertaken by students. Course Mentors will provide guidance, feedback, suggestions and advice, and challenge students to delve deeper and ask questions.  Course Mentors will assist in making initial contacts at the beginning of the semester, however, students must be self-directed and willing to make contacts and engage outside of their 'comfort zone'.

Course Competencies 

  • Explore your field of study in Scotland 
  • Develop intercultural communication skills
  • Implement networking contacts in your chosen career field 
  • Develop the ability to be self-directed
  • Evaluate career possibilities within your field of study
  • Document experiences in chosen career field

Lake Superior State University: SERV 277/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: WIS 279/Career Exploration in an International Setting/3 cr.

UW-Stout: TRDIS 101/Career Exploration/(1 cr. + electives)

UW-Superior: IDS 297/Exploring Majors & Academics/3 cr.

UW- Whitewater:  LSINDP 999/L & S Interdisciplinary Elective/3 cr.

 

MODULE FOUR (select one course from the following options)
Course & Textbook Equivalent

Sociology of Women/Richard Mauldin/Lake Superior State University/3 cr.

This course examines the roles and status of women in contemporary American society, including social structural variance, social psychology, social movements and cross-cultural comparisons.

Textbook: Thinking About Women: Sociological Perspectives on Sex and Gender
by Margaret L. Andersen
Publisher: Pearson
ISBN: 978-0-13-406173-3, 013406173X
Edition 10 (Updated)
Copyright year: 2016

Lake Superior State University: SOCY 321/Sociology of Women/3 cr. 

UW-River Falls: SOCI 326: Sociology of Gender Roles/3 cr.

UW Stout: WGS 311/Topics in Women's Studies/3 cr.

UW Superior: SOCI 210/Sociology of Gender/ 3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: SOCIOLGY 345/Sociology of Women/3 cr.

Painting I/III/Emily Beck/UW-Stout/3 cr.

In this course, we will expand upon our abilities to perceive clearly. We will then translate our directly-observed perceptions into mainly representationally-based oil paintings. Most of our time spent in the course will involve painting directly from the still life. Through rigor and persistence, we'll strengthen our painting skills and develop a level of comfort and fluidity with the medium. 

By working representationally, students will acquire specific skills and techniques, and a sensitivity to the subjects on view that can then be applied to any type of image making. Learning to paint involves exploring a wide range of perceptual, conceptual and instinctual skills. We will explore within and beyond our comfort levels while discovering and researching historical and contemporary painters. Through constructive critique and discussing the work of art 'masters' and contemporary artists, we will learn to 'read' the works of others and consequently discover how to speak more clearly through our own work.

There are many different approaches to painting in this post (post) modern world. We will explore approaches to working representationally and with the beginning of abstraction. As the semester progresses, students will begin to identify their own personal painting styles and approaches.

Students who have completed Painting I may elect to take this course at the higher, Painting III, level.

Textbook(s): Materials List

Painting I: 1.    Gottsegen, Mark David. The Painter’s Handbook.
2.    Gurney, James. Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter.
3.    Optional text, for students interested in working with the figure: Sheppard, Joseph. How to Paint Like the Old Masters.

Painting III: 
1.    Sheppard, Joseph. How to Paint Like the Old Masters.
2.    Gurney, James. Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter.


 

UW-River Falls: ART 238/Intro to Painting/3 cr. -or- ART 338/Studio Painting/3 cr.

UW-Stout: ART 209/Painting I/3 cr. -or- ART 410/Painting III/3 cr.

UW Superior: ART 210/310 Painting 1/ Painting 2/ 3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: ARTSTDIO 321/Painting I/3 cr. -or- ARTSTDIO 426/ Advanced Painting/3 cr.

Scotland: Heritage and Culture/Gerry Mooney/3 cr.

Explores a number of different themes which will be of interest to students - and which will tie in with other aims of widening the opportunities for external engagement for many of the students including: Exploring Scottish Cultural Traditions, Heritage: Exploring the 'Scottish Brand', Exporting Scotland, and Sport & Society in Modern Scotland. Just as there are multiple America's, dependent upon the traditions, beliefs, expectations, and cultures that developed in each area, multiple Scotland's exist. By understanding the heritage/culture of Scotland, students will be able to see how society is structured today as well as see the reason for debates about the direction Scotland will head in the future.

Textbook(s): Textbook provided in Scotland; no purchase required.

Lake Superior State University: SDGE/Cultural Diversity General Education/3 cr.

Murray State University: HIS 390: Special Topics-Scotland/3 cr.

UW-Oshkosh: SS Elective 008U (SS)/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: WIS 310/Scotland: Heritage & Culture/3 cr.

UW-Stout: CAHSS 210/Scotland: Culture & Heritage/3 cr.

UW-Superior: ANTH 289/Anthropology Elective/3 cr. meeting general education requirement: World Languages, Cultures, Philosophy

UW-Whitewater:  ANTHRPL 999/ Anthropology Elective/3 cr.

Career Exploration in an International Setting/On-site course mentor (Resident Director of Academics)/3 cr.

Career Exploration in an International Setting provides a framework that combines aspects of independent study and internship to facilitate the development of a deeper understanding of your field of study and future career aspirations in general, but also beyond the borders of the United States.  You will utilize a combination of job shadowing, informational interviews, online and local resources, and independent research to build a network within your field, and to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the diversity and breadth of career possibilities within your field.

This course is driven by the students' interests and curiosity about their chosen field. Students will actively pursue interviews, networking opportunities, and lines of inquiry independently. Independent research and reading must be undertaken by students. Course Mentors will provide guidance, feedback, suggestions and advice, and challenge students to delve deeper and ask questions.  Course Mentors will assist in making initial contacts at the beginning of the semester, however, students must be self-directed and willing to make contacts and engage outside of their 'comfort zone'.

Course Competencies 

  • Explore your field of study in Scotland 
  • Develop intercultural communication skills
  • Implement networking contacts in your chosen career field 
  • Develop the ability to be self-directed
  • Evaluate career possibilities within your field of study
  • Document experiences in chosen career field

Lake Superior State University: SERV 277/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: WIS 279/Career Exploration in an International Setting/3 cr.

UW-Stout: TRDIS 101/Career Exploration/(1 cr. + electives)

UW-Superior: IDS 297/Exploring Majors & Academics/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: LSINDP 999/L & S Interdisciplinary Elective/3 cr.

 

Meet the fall 2019 faculty

Emily Beck

Emily Bennett Beck has been teaching Art and Design classes at the college/university level for over 13 years. She is currently a Senior Lecturer at the University of Wisconsin-Stout’s School of Art and Design and has taught at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, St. Lawrence University, State University of New York – Potsdam and Clarkson University.  She and her family spent the summer of 2016 at Dalkeith, and they cannot wait to return to have more adventures exploring Scotland!

Emily has a B.A. in Studio Art and Psychology from St. Olaf College, and an M.A., and M.F.A. in Painting from the University of Wisconsin - Madison.  She has exhibited throughout the North America, including cities such as: Madison, Minneapolis, New York, and Montreal, Canada.  Her work can be found at www.Emilybennettbeck.com. She is currently working on a series of children’s book illustrations, and a fine art body of work centered on a critical investigation on themes found in popular fiction.

Future students should expect when taking her classes to see a lot of incredible artworks, old and new, in many different museums, galleries, castles and palaces. Emily is highly enthusiastic about art-making and can’t wait to pass that enthusiasm onto her students.
 

Lissa Schneider-Rebozo

Dr. Lissa Schneider-Rebozo is Professor of English and the founding Director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity at the University of Wisconsin – River Falls. She specializes in British and World Modernisms, with particular interest in the work of Joseph Conrad; cinema studies; Modern East Asia; and sustainability studies. She has published books and articles on Joseph Conrad, Alfred Hitchcock, Louise Erdrich, and Djuna Barnes. She has also published essays on sustainability, East Asian literatures and cinema, international education, and undergraduate research. Her newest work, Conrad and Nature: Essays (Routledge Press, with co-editors Jeffrey Mathes McCarthy and John Peters) was released earlier this year. She has been traveling in Scotland since the 1990s, and is keen to work with students in the dynamic, hands-on learning environment of the Edinburgh & Fringe Festivals, and the many relevant cultural and historical sites in or near our Dalkeith Castle location.  

Joan Navarre

Joan Navarre, PhD, UW-Stout, Department of English and Philosophy

Joan is an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Stout.  She teaches writing, literature and film studies.  She also serves on the board of trustees for The Museum of Soho, London ( http://www.mosoho.org.uk/). 

Her devotion to Great Britain began when she was an undergraduate:  She enrolled in the St. Cloud Centre for British Studies and lived in Alnwick Castle (Harry Potter’s castle, near the Scottish/English border) for a full academic year. 

Joan loves teaching, experiencing live theatre and introducing students to The Edinburgh Festival Fringe.  She is looking forward to teaching again with the Experience Scotland program!