UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN River Falls

College of Arts and Sciences

First Year Adventure Courses

Offered Spring 2019

CAS 101-01: Latin America: Music, Movies, and More

Daniela Goldfine
Tues/Thurs 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.
What do you think about when you hear the words “Latin America”? Sun, beach, dancing, delicious food? Where do those images come from? Let’s explore countries you may have never traveled to – but possibly would like to. Using mainly movies and music, but also news clips and short stories, we will examine people and cultures from across Latin America. Come and join the adventure!

CAS 101-02: The Soundtrack of Your Life

Pat O’Keefe
MWF 12 - 12:50 p.m.
Every person on Earth engages in an activity that we call Music. Whether you are a casual listener or an active performer, music is vitally important to each of us, in this class we explore music from multiple angles. We will look at both the sonic side—examining how music is created, structured, and experienced—and the cultural side, digging into music’s relationship with many aspects of our daily lives. Through these aural adventures you will gain a fuller understanding of the music all around you and the world around us all.

CAS 101-03: The Power of Doodling, Drawing, and Design

Ann Lawton
MWF 9 - 9:50 a.m.
Can doodling be an effective way of note taking? Can we use drawing and design to understand complex information? Can we apply color, shape and texture to share experiences? Absolutely.
Something profound happens when we apply images and symbols with words during the learning process; comprehension, independent thought and creativity flourish. This class requires no artistic skill or "talent" as we’ll play to learn by using sketchbooks, sharpies, post-its, watercolors, and glue sticks. These tools paired with hands-on experiences will help you cultivate your personal identity, community involvement, and academic applications.

CAS 101-04: How Do Sports Shape Our Values and Beliefs?

Greg Kerkvliet
MWF 11 - 11:50 a.m.
Sports: some of us participate, some of us watch, but all of us are affected in some way. This course will focus on our attachments to sports and the patterns of thought and behavior surrounding them. We’ll also dig into the ways that sports connect to other fields such as rhetoric, literature, film studies, mass communications, politics, and psychology.



Offered Fall 2018

CAS 101-1  Latin America: Music, Movies, and More

Daniela Goldfine
Tues/Thurs 11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
What do you think about when you hear the words “Latin America”? Sun, beach, dancing, delicious food? Where do those images come from? Let’s explore countries you may have never traveled to – but possibly would like to. Using mainly movies and music, but also newsclips and short stories, we will examine people and cultures from across Latin America. Come and join the adventure!

CAS 101-2  The Power of Doodling, Drawing, and Design

Ann Lawton
MWF 9 - 9:50 a.m.
Can doodling be an effective way of note taking? Can we use drawing and design to understand complex information? Can we apply color, shape and texture to share experiences? Absolutely.

Something profound happens when we apply images and symbols with words during the learning process; comprehension, independent thought and creativity flourish. This class requires no artistic skill or "talent" as we’ll play to learn by using sketchbooks, sharpies, post-its, watercolors, and glue sticks. These tools paired with hands-on experiences will help you cultivate your personal identity, community involvement, and academic applications.

CAS 101-3  Sit Less and Eat More Chocolate

Ross Jilk
MWF 10 - 10:50 a.m.
“Chocolate is good for your brain…Sitting will take years off your life.” You can’t go long without hearing about a recent study that purports some radical health claim. In this course you will learn how to find and evaluate the studies behind the claims and interpret the validity of the science for yourself.

CAS 101-4  The Soundtrack of Your Life

Pat O’Keefe
MWF 12 -1250 p.m.
Every person on Earth engages in an activity that we call Music. Whether you are a casual listener or an active performer, music is vitally important to each of us, in this class we explore music from multiple angles. We will look at both the sonic side—examining how music is created, structured, and experienced—and the cultural side, digging into music’s relationship with many aspects of our daily lives. Through these aural adventures you will gain a fuller understanding of the music all around you and the world around us all.

CAS 101-5  Communicating Who We Are with Social Media

Grace L. Coggio
MWF 9 - 9:50 a.m.
Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, and other social media have become central to how we communicate with one another. These online applications allow us to network and share information in a variety of fun and creative ways. Social media also gives us unprecedented opportunities to shape and document how we appear to others. This course explores the many ways that we communicate who we are in social media, while also examining the implications for our own identities and the communities we participate in.

CAS 101-6  How Do Sports Shape Our Values and Beliefs?

Greg Kerkvliet
Tues/Thurs 2 - 3:15 p.m.
Sports: some of us participate, some of us watch, but all of us are affected in some way. This course will focus on our attachments to sports and the patterns of thought and behavior surrounding them. We’ll also dig into the ways that sports connect to other fields such as rhetoric, literature, film studies, mass communications, politics, and psychology.

CAS 101-7  99 Problems, But Ain’t This Class One?

Casey Maude
MWF 1 - 1:50 p.m.
Problems confront us on so many levels, from how to address a professor to how to address climate change. As individuals, as members of a community, as a society—problems come in great variety.  Yet so many of them are ones we all share. Training ourselves to identify and analyze the problems that truly concern us is necessary for our survival as humans—and as college students; after all, knowing how to become a successful college student can be its own kind of problem. This course dabbles in multiple disciplines, but is centered in stories that connect us to real-world problems. Of the 99 problems or more you are aware of, which ones would you like some time and resources to better understand?

CAS 101-8  What Does it Mean to Explore?

Arriety Lowell
MWF 1 - 1:50 p.m.
What makes an explorer? What drives curiosity? This class will dig into the meaning of exploration and the connections between exploration, curiosity, science and creativity.

CAS 101-9  Creative Disruption: Use Design to Reimagine Your World

Mary Rohl
Tues/Thurs 8 - 9:15 a.m.
Creativity isn’t a magic gift that only a few artsy people receive. It is simply a different way of looking at things—and something ANYONE can develop.

This class is designed to build your creative confidence using the process of design thinking. We will dispel some common myths about creativity and learn to stretch our creative thinking skills. You will actively practice and develop the process necessary to rethink problems in a way that will change the way you look at your world.

CAS 101-10  Gender and Sexuality in Science Fiction

Rellen Hardtke
Tues/Thurs 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Science fiction encourages us to think beyond what is and to think about what could be. Because it is not bound by current technology or existing cultural norms, science fiction allows us to wonder if some “natural” or seemingly indisputable ideas may be socially constructed, or even arbitrary. Science fiction novels, short stories, television episodes, and films will be the basis for discussion of gender, sexuality, race, ability, and social class.

CAS 101-11  #MeToo: Understanding Sexual Assault from a Scholarly Perspective

Desiree Wiesen-Martin
MWF 10 - 10:50 a.m.
The #MeToo movement has helped to push sexual assault to the forefront of the social landscape. With this new focus it becomes important to understand what constitutes sexual assault, how often sexual assault occurs, and why people don’t report sexual assault. This course will provide students with the opportunity to explore and answer these questions using credible sources.

CAS 101-12  Faster-Higher-Stronger: Olympic Ideals, National Agendas

Rebecca Raham
Tues/Thurs 12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
Do you play sports or enjoy watching sports? Did you ever dream of being an Olympic athlete? Are you curious about the connection between sports and culture? In this course, we will examine the Olympic ideal of international cooperation against a background of political conflicts, terrorist acts, and the Olympics’ use as a site of protest. We will also ask what individual athletes and national governments risk to be faster – higher – stronger. Starting with the 1936 Olympics in Nazi Germany, we will use documentary and fictional films, historical texts, and personal narratives to explore these and other questions about the Olympics.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FYA gallery

More coming soon...

Click to view full-sized image
FYA professor Pat O’Keefe’s class explores the music and culture of Brazil at UWRF’s Carnival Brasilerio FYA professor Pat O'Keefe's class explores the music and culture of Brazil at UWRF's Carnival Brasilerio. Pictured from left to right are Mya Larson (FYA student), Emily Jackson (FYA student), Dandra Odara (guest singer from Brazil), Professor O'Keefe, and Kali Teply (FYA student).

Contact Us

College of Arts and Sciences
136 Kleinpell Fine Arts
715-425-3777
CAS@uwrf.edu

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