Summer 2015

Experiencing Scotland in the summer allows you to design an experience that works best for you. The program is broken into four, 3-week modules. You'll enroll in one course each module and you can participate in anywhere from just one, to all four modules. Dates for each module can be found on our calendars page, and information about the courses offered during each module can be found below:

Module One

Module Two

Module Three

Module Four

Module One

Course and Textbook
Equivalents

Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Studies/Lisa Hager (UW–Waukesha County)/3 cr.
This course will provide an introduction into Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Studies. LGBTQ Studies  as an interdisciplinary field using humanities text-based critical analysis, the course will focus on how the central concepts of sexual orientation and gender identity work within history, politics, literature, technology, art, music, philosophy, and literature. Throughout this course, students will work towards a deep understanding of the intersectional dynamics of privilege and oppression as they relate to LGBTQ individuals and culture by exploring the lived experiences of LGBTQ individuals and their partners/families. This course will also take full advantage of its geographical locale and will incorporate various events associated with Pride Scotia (Scotland's LGBTQ Pride Festival) in Edinburgh, which will be happening during the course.

Textbook(s):

UW-Colleges: WOM 201/Introduction to LGBTQ Studies/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: WGST 350 / Introduction to LGBTQ Studies/3 cr. GE(MD)

UW-Stout: HDFS 352/Sexual & Gender Identities in Families & Societies/3 cr.

UW-Superior: WST 289/3 cr.

British Invasion: Sex, Drugs & Rock n Roll in Global Politics/Ellie Schemenauer & Jeffrey Herriott (UW–Whitewater)/3 cr. 
This course examines British colonial and postcolonial relationships through an analysis of sex, drugs and rock-n-roll in global politics. Informed by feminist and postcolonial literature, we take seriously the explanatory power and importance of gender, race, class, sexuality, nationality and citizenship, in the shaping, defining, and legitimating of British international affairs.  Unit One (Sex) examines the sexual politics of British imperialism. We focus on such topics as prostitution in British India, anti-imperial criticisms of Nabobinas (the wives, mothers, sisters and daughters of East India Company employees), and sex tourism in Jamaica. Unit Two (Drugs) examines illicit drug trafficking and migration networks between the Caribbean and Great Britain. Using the case of women drug couriers from Jamaica, we explore the gendered, racialized and sexualized dynamics of the movement of illicit drugs. In addition, we explore the politics of surveillance and incarceration rates of the postcolonized "other" in Britain as a result of the specter of illicit drugs. Unit Three (Rock-n-Roll) focuses on examining issues of power and privilege in British colonial and postcolonial relations through music. Turning first to Jamaica, we explore the development of Ska and Reggae in the context of political resistance to Great Britain (and the United States). We then turn our attention to British-India relations, exploring the influence of Indian Classical Music and "Raga Rock" on British Invasion of the 1960s. Here we look specifically at the influence on the music of the Beatles, the Kinks, and others in the context of postcolonial relationships and exotica.  

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: WGST 389: Special topics in Women's and Gender Studies/ 3 cr.

UW-Superior: WST 489/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: WOMENST 455 Issues and Topics in Women's and Gender Studies/3 cr.

Introduction to Social Work/Elizabeth Twining Blue (UW–Superior)/3 cr.
Overview of the social work profession, including its historical roots, practice settings, clients served, methods of practice, values and ethics. Also provides an overview of knowledge and skills needed for generalist social work practice with various minority and special populations, including American Indians. Thirty hours of service learning in social service agencies provide an added opportunity to learn about the profession. Open to non-majors. Note: For the WIS Program the 30 hours of service learning will be adapted into other activities to take advantage of being in another country. Approaches to social welfare in the United States originated from early social welfare structures and laws in the British Isles. Being in-country allows the  unique opportunity to track how, from a common point of origin social welfare has developed and evolved over time in each country. The substance (lectures, readings, in-class activities) of the course will lay the foundation for understanding that history and development in each country. 

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: SOWK 389/Special Topics in Social Work/3 cr.

UW-Stout: SOCWK 205/Introduction to Social Work/3 cr.

UW-Superior: SO W 121/Introduction to Social Work/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: SOCWORK 102/Introduction to Social Welfare/3 cr.

Introduction to Entrepreneurship/Jeff Vanevenhoven (UW–Whitewater)/3 cr.
The course focuses on introducing students to the world of entrepreneurship in Scotland and the UK. Students will apply concepts to the wide range of challenges facing Scotland entrepreneurs. Through experiential learning opportunities, students will pursue ideation and tools associated with business model development. A special focus will be placed on global entrepreneurship concentrating on identifying and evaluating opportunities in Scotland. Identification focuses on exploring demographic and societal trends, consumer and industrial needs, technological and knowledge changes. Evaluation involves customer and industry market assessments, and the acquisition of resources.

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: MNGT 430/Small Business Management/3 cr.

UW-Stout: BUMGT or BUINB XXX/3 cr.

UW-Superior: BUS 289/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: BEINDP 201/Introduction to Entrepreneurship/3 cr.

Stress Management/Ray Reinertsen (UW-Superior)/3 cr.
Exploration of the mind-body link in mental health and individual wellness. Subject areas include emotional well-being, mental illness, life crises, stress, and healthy stress management.

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: HEAL 269 / Wellness/ 3 cr. GE(HW)

UW-Stout: PE XXX/3 cr.

UW-Superior: HLTH 267/Stress Management/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: HEALTHED 362/Stress Management/3 cr.





Module Two

Course and Textbook
Equivalents

Introduction to International Business/Jeff Vanevenhoven & Linda Reid (UW–Whitewater)/3 cr.
This introductory interdisciplinary course addresses current theory and practice on conducting business in international markets. Topics in culture and communication and the business functions in an international environment will be addressed at an introductory level. Students will discuss international institutions, complete a project in the internationalization of functional business operations, and resolve case problems for international business operations.

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: MNGT 355/ International Business/3 cr. GP

UW-Stout: BUINB 260/Business International/3 cr.

UW-Superior: BUS 430/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: BEINDP 200/Introduction to International Business/3 cr.

The Ecology of Social Policy Making/Elizabeth Twining Blue (UW–Superior)/3 cr.
First in a two-course sequence. Provides an ecological overview of policymaking -- how differing systems and values interact to create the policy-making environment. Begins with a review of the history of social welfare and uses this historical lens to examine the structure of present social welfare policies and service programs. Focuses on understanding political forces and processes which impact social policy development, as well as upon how ethical, cultural, social and economic justice issues impact the creation of social welfare policy and programs at the local, regional, national and international levels. Recommend completion of UW-Superior SO W 121, or equivalent. Open to non-majors.

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls SOWK 389/ 3cr.

UW-Stout: SOCWK XXX/3 cr.

UW-Superior: SO W 325/The Ecology of Social Policy Making/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: SOCWORK 462/Social Welfare Policy/3 cr.

British Invasion: Sex, Drugs & Rock n Roll in Global Politics/Ellie Schemenauer & Jeffrey Herriott (UW–Whitewater)/3 cr.
This course examines British colonial and postcolonial relationships through an analysis of sex, drugs and rock-n-roll in global politics. Informed by feminist and postcolonial literature, we take seriously the explanatory power and importance of gender, race, class, sexuality, nationality and citizenship, in the shaping, defining, and legitimating of British international affairs.  Unit One (Sex) examines the sexual politics of British imperialism. We focus on such topics as prostitution in British India, anti-imperial criticisms of Nabobinas (the wives, mothers, sisters and daughters of East India Company employees), and sex tourism in Jamaica. Unit Two (Drugs) examines illicit drug trafficking and migration networks between the Caribbean and Great Britain. Using the case of women drug couriers from Jamaica, we explore the gendered, racialized and sexualized dynamics of the movement of illicit drugs. In addition, we explore the politics of surveillance and incarceration rates of the postcolonized "other" in Britain as a result of the specter of illicit drugs. Unit Three (Rock-n-Roll) focuses on examining issues of power and privilege in British colonial and postcolonial relations through music. Turning first to Jamaica, we explore the development of Ska and Reggae in the context of political resistance to Great Britain (and the United States). We then turn our attention to British-India relations, exploring the influence of Indian Classical Music and "Raga Rock" on British Invasion of the 1960s. Here we look specifically at the influence on the music of the Beatles, the Kinks, and others in the context of postcolonial relationships and exotica. 

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: WGST 389: Special topics in Women's and Gender Studies/ 3 cr. 

UW-Superior: WST 489/3 cr. 

UW-Whitewater: WOMENST 455 Issues and Topics in Women's and Gender Studies/3 cr.

Nature Writing/Yvonne Rutford (UW-Superior)/3 cr.
This course explores the genre of nature writing, with a focus on the nature essay. Students will examine exemplary works of modern and classic nature writing, focusing on the work of John Muir, and apply strategies of description, storytelling, and research to create nature essays of their own. In addition, this course is intended to further entrench in student writers a writing practice and process. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify the writing strategies that make for successful nature essays, document their own observations and experiences in and about nature, understand and apply audience/purpose principles to their written work, and develop and revise nature essays that synthesize their personal experience/observation and their research on natural history, science, and/or conservation ethics and philosophy. Prerequisite is completion of UW-Superior WRIT 102 (first-year composition), or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls:ENGL 389: Special topics in English

UW-Stout: ENGL XXX/3 cr.

UW-Superior: WRIT 301/Nature Writing/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: ENGL 472/Nature Writing/3 cr.

Health & Wellness/Ray Reinertsen (UW-Superior)/3 cr.
A basic knowledge and understanding of health and critical thinking that provides students with the opportunity to develop and implement a plan for reaching their optimal level of functioning physically, emotionally, socially, mentally, spiritually, environmentally and occupationally. Does not count toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance at UW-Superior.  

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls:HEAL269/Wellness/ 3 cr. GE(HW)

UW-Stout: PE 201/Wellness & Social Responsibility/3 cr.

UW-Superior: HLTH 267/Health & Wellness/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: PEGNRL 192/Personal Health and Fitness Life/3 cr.





Module Three

Course and Textbook
Equivalents

Social Aspects of Sport/Matt Fencl (UW-Baraboo/Sauk County)/3 cr.
A course focusing on sport institutions as social organizations and how they function within a culture or society. Emphasis is placed on group structure and membership, as well as group pressure, socialization, stratification, and deviance as they apply to the sport's setting. Significant emphasis is placed on the role of minorities in sports. Selected topics include sport and: educational institutions, socialization, children, deviance, violence and aggression, gender and equity, race and ethnicity, social class, social mobility and stratification, economy, politics, religion, and the media.

Textbook(s):

UW-Colleges: HES 217/Social Aspects of Sport/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: P ED Elective/3 cr.

UW-Stout: PE 362/Psycho-Social Aspects of Athletics/2 cr.

UW-Superior: SOCI 289/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: PEPROF EL/Physical Education Professional Elective/3 cr.

Travel Writing/Yvonne Rutford (UW-Superior)/3 cr.
In this course we explore the genre of travel writing, with the goals of understanding the conventions specific to the genre of travel writing; writing with attention to audience and purpose; sharpening skills of observation, description, narration, and research necessary to writing about a place/destination; developing travel narratives that incorporate research and personal observation; and understanding ethical/political/cultural considerations and criticisms of travel writing.

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: ENGL 389/ Special Topics/ 3 cr.

UW-Stout: ENGL XXX/3 cr.

UW-Superior: WRIT 270/Travel Writing/3 cr.

Teaching Elementary School Music /Lois Guderian (UW–Superior)/3 cr.
Preparation for the elementary education degree at UW-Superior. Designed to develop student's knowledge, skills and dispositions for integrating music into the elementary classroom: basic strategies in song teaching, classroom instrument playing, harmonizing of children's songs, integrated and interdisciplinary lesson design, and instructional strategies according to children's physical, cognitive and emotional development. Students learn ways to engage children in activities such as singing, playing instruments, moving to music and composing, all in support of the elementary curriculum.

Textbook(s):

UW-Stout: MUSIC XXX/3 cr.

UW-Superior: MUSIC 383/Teaching Elementary School Music/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: MUSED 323/Elementary School Music Methods/3 cr.

Introduction to Sustainable Development/Linda Reid (UW–Whitewater)/3 cr.
A course in which students will be exposed to relevant developments and insights from experts in various fields of business. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credits in degree at UW-Whitewater. In this course, students will explore the concept of sustainable development in a global context. The course is focused on development that looks to balance different, and often competing, needs against an awareness of the environmental, social and economic limitations we face as a society. It includes a thorough analysis of the criteria and indicators of sustainable development and their applicability at a local, national and international level. Particular attention is paid to current sustainable development efforts by governments, civil society groups, and businesses in Scotland and United States, in both rural and urban environments.

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: ECON 328/Domestic Topics in Economic Development/3 cr. GP

UW-Superior: BUS 289/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: BEINDP 210/Introduction to Sustainable Development/3 cr.

An Introduction to Addiction & Recovery/Elizabeth Twining Blue (UW–Superior)/3 cr.
Overview of the dynamics of addiction, examining its impact upon individuals, families, agencies and communities. Includes description of the recovery process and the role of social work, criminal justice and other helping professionals in the treatment of addiction. Opportunity to conduct intensive study of this area. Emphasis on learning to interact effectively with vulnerable and at-risk populations.

Textbook(s):

UW-River Falls: SOWK 250/ Use, Abuse and Addiction/ 3 cr.

UW-Superior: SO W 350/An Introduction to Addiction & Recovery/3 cr.





Module Four

Course and Textbook
Equivalents

British History/Scottish Professor Joyce Miller/3 cr.
This elective course for students on the Wisconsin in Scotland program is an introduction to Scottish history from early times through to the nineteenth century. Students will study a range of political, social and cultural factors which have shaped the history of Scotland, as an independent nation and as part of the United Kingdom. These will include: the development of a kingdom, the Wars of Independence, the role of the church, the dramatic events of Mary Queen of Scots' reign, the Union of Crowns, witches and witch hunting, the Civil War, Union of Parliaments, the Jacobites and the Highland Clearances and students will be able the experience and contextualize the material covered in the course during their time in Scotland.

Textbook(s):
Textbook provided in Scotland; no purchase required.

Normandale Community College: HIST Elective/3 cr. (5, 8)

UW-Colleges: HIST Elective/3 cr.

UW-Oshkosh: History 008/3 cr. (SS)

UW-River Falls: WIS 200/British History/3 cr., Liberal Arts (SB)

UW-Stout: HIST-345-0S1/Modern British History/3 cr.

UW-Superior: HIST 289/Special Topics: British History/3 cr. (Humanities/History)

UW-Whitewater: HISTRY 497/History Exchange Study/3 cr.

Theater Appreciation: Festival Fringe/Joan Navarre (UW-Stout)/3 cr.
This course emphasizes the relationships between the technical and artistic components of theatre practices of the past and present from cultures around the world. Utilizing the Edinburgh Fringe Festival as the laboratory experience, the students will: develop an appreciation of the various aspects of the working and performing theatre, and how the technical and artistic components of theatre complement each other; develop an appreciation for a general history of the theatre and the diversity of theatrical forms; and develop the ability to articulate a critical analysis or review of the theatrical performances they attend.

Textbook(s):

UW-Oshkosh: THEATRE 161/Appreciation of Drama/3 cr. (Hu)

UW-River Falls: THEA 105/Introduction to Theatre and Drama/3 cr. GE (HF)

UW-Stout: SPCOM 232/Introduction to the Theater/3 cr.

UW-Superior: COMM 122/Theatre Appreciation/3 cr. (Arts Appreciation)

UW-Whitewater: THEATRE 100/Theatre Appreciation/3 cr.

Special Topics in Theatre: Edinburgh Fringe Festival/Joan Navarre (UW-Stout)/3 cr.*
Examination of areas of theatre. Topics vary depending on student interest/needs to the current season offering. 

*Students who have taken Theatre Appreciation or its equivalent may enroll in this course.

Textbook(s):

UW-Oshkosh: Communication Elective/3 cr.

UW-River Falls: THEA 389/Special Topics in Theatre/3 cr.

UW-Stout: THEA 300/Special Topics in Theatre/3 cr.

UW-Superior: COMM 377/Special Topics in Theatre/3 cr.

UW-Whitewater: THEATRE 496/3 cr.






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