Mao Sea Lee

Mao Sea Lee

 

Mao LeeMajor: Psychology

Minor: Interdisciplinary

Anticipated Graduation Date: December, 2013

Research Supervisor: Dr. Mariana Pachecolink, Curriculum and Instruction, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Melanie Ayres, Psychology, University of Wisconsin-River Falls

Research Location: University of Wisconsin-Madison Summer Education Research Program, Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP), Summer 2013

Research Topic: Thinking beyond English-only: A Literature Review of Collaborative Brokering among Bilingual Children

Abstract:

Many bi/multilingual children broker daily for their family who may speak little to no English. Brokering has its advantages; it benefits families, institutions, and the brokers themselves. Yet, brokering is both complex and ambiguous. Thus, this literature review examines this social practice to explore the advantages collaborative brokering has, specifically within a classroom setting. This literature review covers brokering, collaboration, and collaborative language practices. Excerpts of brokering among third-grade Spanish-English speaking children was used to illustrate the specific skills, linguistic resources, and cultural knowledge teachers could leverage as they implement collaborative brokering in classroom settings.


Research Supervisor & Faculty Mentor: Dr. Melanie Ayres, Psychology, University of Wisconsin-River Falls  

Research Location: University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Fall 2012 

Research Topic: English Proficiency: A Predictive Factor for Academic Success?  

Abstract:

Many English Language Learner (ELL) students score low on state standardized tests (Muyskens, Betts, Lau, & Marston, 2009). Therefore, the current study examines whether there is a relationship between taking ELL classes in high school and grades in college. Participants were 33 Hmong college students who took an online survey that included questions about their experience with ELL classes as well as their past and current academic achievement. Preliminary results did not find a significant correlation between ELL classes and high school or college academic achievement. However, the age at which students first learned English seems to be critical.


Research Supervisor & Faculty Mentor: Dr. Melanie Ayres, Psychology, University of Wisconsin-River Falls

Research Location: University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Summer 2012

Research Topic: Asian American Women's Experiences of and Responses to Unfair Treatment.

Abstract:

The current study investigated what kinds of discrimination young Asian American women experience, how they cope with the incident in the moment, and what conversations about discrimination include.  An online survey about a memorable experience of unfair treatment was given to 77 Asian American college-aged women from northern California.  Results yielded the most common sources of discrimination were strangers, family adults and peers.  Asian American women experienced discrimination from various contexts.  Race/ethnicity was found to be the main attribution of discrimination.  Several coping mechanisms were used among these women; two main ones were to ignore the discrimination and to express one's emotions.  There were a few common themes found in conversations with listeners.  Listeners were most likely to express empathy and discuss discrimination.  These findings suggest young Asian American women face several different forms of unfair treatment and react differently.


University of Wisconsin-River Falls
410 S. 3rd Street, River Falls WI 54022 USA
Campus Information 715-425-3911